News Briefs April 29, 2019

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Use Navigating the weather, potential pests, disease threats and other operational needs can challenge even the most experienced farmer. Pioneer field agronomists are available to help guide decisions and maximize yield potential.

This week’s briefs cover hybrid maturity, soybean cyst nematode and how wind affects crops. 

Want to speak with an expert on these or other topics? Contact Kacey Birchmier at kacey.birchmier@corteva.com.


Crop Insights

When to Switch Hybrid Maturity

A wet spring has delayed planting in many areas and left farmers wondering when they need to switch hybrids. Soil conditions are the primary determining factor for planting. If conditions aren’t right, planting must wait. As a rule of thumb, farmers in the Central Corn Belt should not make any hybrid changes until late May or early June…Hear more


Soybean Cyst Nematode

Soybean cyst nematode is the world’s leading yield-robbing soybean pest. Once SCN infests a field, it can’t be eliminated. Instead, management becomes key to keeping SCN levels low enough to prevent yield loss. Rotating to a nonhost crop is critical. Planting corn can reduce SCN populations by about 50%. Planting SCN-resistant soybeans is also a good strategy…Hear more


How Wind Affects Crop Growth

Wind has an interesting impact on plant growth and development. When the wind blows, it keeps a constant concentration of carbon dioxide gas across the leaf surface. This increases plant growth and development. Wind isn’t always beneficial, however. Too much wind can dry out soil or cause plant lodging…Hear more


In the News

Wet Fall, Spring Pose Unusual Planting Considerations

Fall weather was not conducive to field work, leaving farmers with much to do this spring. Continued wet conditions have created some unusual considerations for planting season. Pioneer field agronomist Brad Ott said time constraints have many farmers considering differing approaches.

“If you’ve been in a conventional-till situation, maybe we need to look more at minimal-till or even no-till,” he said…Hear more

Kacey Birchmier Kacey Birchmier
kacey.birchmier@corteva.com

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