News Briefs August 21, 2017

Published:

News You Can Use

Much of the continental United States will be cast in shadow later today as the total solar eclipse moves from west to east. A little less sunlight won’t stop the Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour which also moves across the Corn Belt this week. Read on for more on this, silage harvest tips and more. Want to speak with a Pioneer expert on these or other topics? Contact Susan Mantey at susan.mantey@pioneer.com.


Pioneer In the News

DuPont Pioneer Sponsors 2017 Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour

DuPont Pioneer will share field updates every evening as the premier sponsor for the 2017 Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour this week. More than 100 crop scouts will travel designated routes and gather samples from more than 1,100 fields. Covering seven Corn Belt states, the tour provides valuable late-season and harvest information. To attend a local event or schedule an interview with a local agronomist from Iowa during the tour, contact Susan Mantey, susan.mantey@pioneer.com or 614-902-0836…Read more

EASTERN TOUR

  • August 21– Fishers, IN
  • August 22 – Bloomington, IL
  • August 23 – Iowa City, IA

WESTERN TOUR

  • August 21– Grand Island, NE
  • August 22 – Nebraska City, NE
  • August 23 – Spencer, IA

CROP TOUR FINALE

  • August 24 –Rochester, MN

Things to Consider Before Silage Harvest

Trent Brisby, DuPont Pioneer account manager for Northwest Ohio, says silage harvest is just around the corner.

“When we start to get into that 36 percent moisture, 50 to 75 percent milkline… that’s about the time we are going to start talking about chopping silage,” he said…Hear more


Crop Insights

Sensing Crop Health From Space

Remote sensing through aircraft of satellite imagery allows growers to pinpoint problem areas, which can save time and money. Satellite images can be used to develop management zone-directed soil sampling, validate hybrid tests or evaluate other agronomic practices…Read more


Kudzu Bug May Hinder Soybean Development in Southeast

The Kudzu bug—named for the invasive species of foliage—results in an average yield loss of 18 percent in Georgia, South Carolina and neighboring states. Populations of Kudzu bugs peak in September, and feeding results in brown lesions on the stems of soybeans, reduced pods per plant, reduced seed per pod and reduced seed size…Read more

Featured Links